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i am a huge fan of Diane Arbubs.

Today I was studying some of her work and stumbled onto this quote. You know those moments when you really need an answer to something but you dont even know how to ask the question in the first place? Well thats what was happening today. Thats what was happening today when i came across the above quote from her. 

So then I got lost in her images and really got to see what she was talking about.

Diane Arbus - A Couple Kissing on Stage, N.Y.C., 1963 

Diane Arbus - A Couple Kissing on Stage, N.Y.C., 1963 

It's no surprise that I draw a lot of inspiration from her when I shoot my street photography and portrait work. Its not that i consciously try to recreate or emulate her images in regards to lighting, composition or subject -but the ability to go unnoticed. i was not there for the shooting of her images so i don't know how they were captured but what i take away is this quality and relationship with the subject. She doesn't seem to be a threat or imposing to anyone in the image & I don't know if this is attributed to her ability to blend in, her relationships with the subject, or a level of comfortability between the two. or could it be simply that the subject was just as intrigued by her as she was of them? 

Child with Toy Hand Grenade in Central Park, New York City (1962)

Child with Toy Hand Grenade in Central Park, New York City (1962)

Two Ladies at the Automat, N.Y.C., 1966

Two Ladies at the Automat, N.Y.C., 1966

As a photographer we learn and I think sometimes once we know a technique or skill, we then focus on that & forget we are there to capture a moment. And moments well...they happen. Sometimes they cannot be arranged & you must arrange yourself. Controlling the environment, lighting, subject sometimes i think we get caught up on the technical. Im looking to find this balance between the two, acknowledging when to turn it on, turn it off or just let the two exist in harmony.

Topless Dancer in Her Dressing Room, San Francisco (1968)

Topless Dancer in Her Dressing Room, San Francisco (1968)

(All photographs copyrighted by the Estate of Diane Arbus)